Involution: An Odyssey Reconciling Science to God by Philippa Rees

http://www.amazon.com/Involution-Odyssey-Reconciling-Science-God-ebook/dp/B00DEKR01A/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1414495359&sr=1-1&keywords=involution+by+philippa+rees

This book has been called ‘…a brilliant and profoundly erudite epic…a heroic intellectual tour de force…’ (by David Lorimer, the Director of the Scientific and Medical Network) and both ‘brave…and totally insightful’ (by Ervin Laszlo) but the book defies description; it breaks all the rules and is unlike any other. It is so comprehensive in its sweep, original in its writing, and its synthesis, that to isolate any aspect is to misrepresent all the others.

Two characters, Reason and Soul, undertake a light-hearted poetic journey through the chronology of Western scientific thought to expose a bold hypothesis— that science has been guided by the gradual and accelerating recovery of memory. That recovery has been through the inspired maverick genius and it moves backwards through time; from man’s emergence, (at one with the natural world), through the increasingly separate disciplines to the holistic origins; the birth of stars and the start of time. This incremental excavation and transfer of memory to intellect implies the pre-human encoding of consciousness in the very structure of matter, and all organic life.

It is the sweep of history that exposes this reversal of time: It requires all the disciplines of science, all the epochs of thought, and only poetic economy could convey this accompanying purposeful complement to the Darwinian random and accidental. It is the wood and not the trees that the work surveys from the height of a poetic balloon. Yet, paradoxically, the collective journey has been lit by individuals, unique in their contributions to the field that claims only ‘objective’ repeatable and validated truth. The same pattern is mirrored in the history of painting and the structure of musical composition. Genius differs only in the languages of expression.

In nine Cantos the two companions travel through pre-human involution, and early man’s emergence on the Serengeti to the recorded civilisations of Greece, Rome, the Dark Ages, the Renaissance, into the Enlightenment and finally Modernism when the success of science completely obscures half of the story, the story of involution. Science’s external domination has reproduced the web of consciousness in the internet, and its tools are the bones of its journey, but the life of the spirit has withered through science’s insistence on objectivity, and its neglect of its own subjective origins. Mystical experience is perhaps the most attested and agreed upon encounter, across climes and times, differing only in the words chosen to clothe it.

But there is more to it than merely science; for science is a language through which to follow a deeper journey, Man’s collective journey inwards, to the nature of himself: which is why the scientific signposts are appropriately confined to end-notes to leave the poetic journey un-encumbered. They take no scientific knowledge for granted: they are not essential to the poetic narrative but instead caulk the ship of science in which we travel.

The scientific serpent of DNA, the most likely candidate for memory, ends with a soliloquy, an invitation to re-acquaintance with love, for episodes of love through contemplation and self-forgetting has informed science all along.

The work restores the spiritual, and finds it within the process of mystical science. The perennial philosophy is newly validated in twentieth century language.

By adding involution to evolution, mind and matter become two sides of a single coin, only perceived as distinct through the collective intellect’s division from its deeper self, from consciousness, from experience, from rapture and understanding. The co creation of God and the universe is what this book restores and is about.

Editorial Reviews

Philippa Rees wrote a book that is a rarity: it is on a controversial, actually hair- and eye-brow-raising subject, and it is totally sincere. And totally insightful. If you the reader are as brave as this author, you are in for a fantastic ride. Getting close to science as well as to God at the same time. That’s no mean feat. Enjoy the ride – and the light! (Dr. Ervin Laszlo)

Philippa Rees

Philippa Rees

The lives distilled in the work of Philippa have been as manifold as the proverbial cat. But all have fed into the mix. Born in South Africa to a family on both sides of the Boer war divide (half fighting the other half) her childhood was equally extreme. As an only child of a single mother she was imprisoned in harsh boarding schools, but holidays were spent on her horse riding the mountains of Lesotho, or on safaris with a beloved grandfather inspecting African schools in the remotest areas of Botswana, shooting for the pot and camping under the stars.

In the background of solitary African existence there were always books, and a family that valued them: Her grandmother was a Barrett, related to Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and her great great aunt corresponded with George Eliot, whose step sons she befriended in tragic circumstances. So writing and literature were the ways to make sense of experience.

Choices were always difficult because everything was equally interesting: university involved sampling five faculties before deciding on zoology and psychology. Early marriage to a marine biologist took her to an island off the Mozambique coast, scavenging on the mud flats for abundant sea food, but post only by occasional fishing boat. Her first book ‘Dryads and Drinking Water’ was set in Mozambique at the start of the civil war. Later life took her first to Florida and then to the Max Planck Institute in Bavaria where she lived in an eleventh century saw mill on the banks of a lake with an unrepentant Nazi landlady, while her husband worked with Konrad Lorenz and the exciting school of animal behaviour that surrounded him.

Following some profound spiritual experiences Philippa divorced and came to England with two small daughters, where she converted some barns as a music centre, and taught courses on ‘Saints and Scientists’ at Bristol University. But writing always came first, and none of it slotted into a Dewey Index easily. Her poetic novella ‘A Shadow in Yucatan’ is an evocation of the atmosphere of the sixties, set in Florida. A new ‘magnum opus’, a poetic history of Western thought, ‘Involution’ is due to be published in March 2013. After that she hopes to publish her short stories revealing the gulf between New and Old World attitudes and a novel based upon her personal experiences. She has four daughters and lives in Somerset.

Listen to a fascinating interview with Philippa Rees here.

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NoViolet Bulawayo wins 2014 Zora Neale Hurston/ Richard Wright Legacy Award

thegatvolblogger

 NoViolet Bulawayo inner magazine page

In my last post, 13 Lessons I Learned From Blogging, a few hours ago I described NoViolet Bulawayo as “one of the hottest literary talents to come out of Zimbabwe.” It might have sounded hyperbolic, but she reinforced my observations by clinching the 2014 Zora Neale Hurston/ Richard Wright Legacy Award for her awesome fictional debut, We Need New Names

She received the prestigous 2014 Hurston/ Wright Legacy Award for fiction on Friday at the Carnegie Library in Northwest Washington.

This award is a fitting reward for a young literary star on the rise. Her debut novel has taken the world by storm and caused such a sensation, I can only imagine what her future work will do.

Inner pages on an article on NoViolet Bulawayo An article, on NoViolet Bulawayo talking about her craft, I stumbled on in the New Books magazine in my local library and I took the pictures. Little did I…

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Legends of Windemere – The Compass Key Cover Reveal

Jo Robinson

Debuting August 8th on Amazon Kindle!

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Swords will clash and spells will fly in the newest adventure of young warrior Luke Callindor, Nyx the magic-flinging caster, and their friends.

With Sari captured by their enemies, the champions of Windemere are determined to get her back and destroy the Lich’s castle. Little do they realize, their battles in the Caster Swamp are only the beginning of this adventure. Trinity and her Chaos Elves have invaded the city of Gaia in search of a relic called the Compass Key. Rumored to be the key to rescuing Sari from a magical island, our heroes are in a race to find the mysterious relic.

Which side will claim the Compass Key? And, what will our heroes do when they’re faced with an enemy whose evil power overshadows anything they have ever faced?

About the Author:

Charles author photo B&WCharles Yallowitz was born…

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Mourning Has Broken – Carol Balawyder

I’ve just reviewed Mourning has broken by Carol Balawyder. Carol Balawyder was born in Sherbrooke, Quebec and now lives in Montreal. She taught ESL and criminology for many years. Now, retired, she concentrates her time on writing crime novels, memoirs (see Mourning Has Broken under C.A. Balawyder)and women’s fiction. She is the author of Open for Business, Windows on Sci-Tech and her stories have appeared in Room Magazine, The Anthology of Canadian Writers and Mindful.org.
You can visit her at http://www.carolbalawyder.com

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Mourning Has Broken offers a moving and poignant look at grief and loss. In this collection of narrative non-fiction essays, the author speaks from the heart not only about the death of a dear sister but also about the mourning of a mother, a father, a dear friend, a career and a religion.
Her sister’s death tore her heart apart. The grief she felt for her was more intense than any grief she ever felt for the death of someone dear to her. Perhaps it was the amalgamation of un-mourned griefs, or maybe it was because it was closer to home . To lose a parent puts your mortality next in line; to lose a sister, you are no longer in line – you have crossed the threshold.

When her mother died she wrote Don’t Bring me Flowers, an essay which is in this collection. In the weeks which followed her sister’s death , an urge to write an essay about her emerged . It was at page eighty that she realized the essay had flown off on its own and that she’d given herself a mission. For one year she would write about her mourning. In that year the author goes about her life as memories and myriads of emotions assail her.
Through it all, she explores the meaning of life and the changes of her own beliefs, taking the reader through a journey of sorrow, guilt, regret, joy and hope.
Readers who have known loss will find much to relate to in this book, and will particularly appreciate the author’s ability to be frank and open and at times humorous about feelings that might be difficult to acknowledge.

http://www.amazon.com/Mourning-Has-Broken-Carol-Balawyder-ebook/dp/B00607D2CA/ref=la_B00HVETKWM_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1407225998&sr=1-1

New Release – Finally Back Home – Irfaan Ihsan Jaffer

An inspirational first collection of mystic spiritual poetry from Canadian author Irfaan Ihsan Jaffer . These poems are “songs of the soul” in the tradition of Rumi and Kahlil Gibran.

http://www.amazon.com/Finally-Back-Irfaan-Ihsan-Jaffer-ebook/dp/B00M04ENCU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406252338&sr=8-1&keywords=ihsan+jaffer

Irfaan “Ihsan” Jaffer is currently a Doctoral candidate at York University in Canada, Ontario. He studies comparative religion and the application of religious mysticism in the modern world. Two things have influenced Ihsan’s poetry. The first is his experiences in the spiritual exercise known as the latihan. More information can be found at http://www.subud.com/spiritual.html. The second is the sacred texts, spiritual practices and founders/saints of the world’s great religions in general, and his own in particular.

International Authors Day 18 July – Tour and Giveaway

Jo Robinson

International Authors Day

There are National and International Days for just about every little thing under the sun, including Wiggle Your Toes Day coming up on the August 6 by the way. I for one have every intention of wiggling my toes like crazy for that entire date. When self-confessed super book addict and reviewer Debdatta Dasgupta Sahay found out that there was no International Authors Day she decided to remedy that sorry fact.

She said :

“ I was shocked to realize that there’s isn’t an International Authors’ Day that we can all celebrate to show our appreciation for the hours of hard work that authors put into their books… So I decided to do something about it!

I am going to celebrate ‘International Authors’ Day’ on 18th July. Will you join me?

I will be organizing a Blog hop that will go on from 14th to 18th July. Join in and…

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Miedo by Kevin Cooper – My Review

Jo Robinson

It’s not often that my jaw physically drops when I’m reading a book, especially in a biographical drama where you know you can expect a real life shocker or two, so you’re pretty much expecting them to come. I had a couple of those moments reading Miedo with the matter of fact way that Kevin Cooper tells his story. I read it in two sittings, because at every point you just have to know what happens next, and now I’m hoping that there will be much more to come from Miedo.
The author has a unique way of drawing you into these early years in a way that will keep you riveted, and the mixture of joy, shock, and some real hair-raising terror that are so skilfully woven into some of the delights of childhood not only had me right there in Miedo’s life, but also remembering things about my…

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